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Dawn Araujo-Hawkins

Religion Journalist

Topeka, Kansas

Dawn Araujo-Hawkins

Lady journo writing religion at the Global Sisters Report | Proud Ball State University alumna | Prolific em dasher Real Housewives GIFer

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A Jew, a Christian, and a Muslim walk into a parking lot...

IN FALL 1884, the congregation that became Temple Israel opened its doors as the first Jewish synagogue in the state of Nebraska. From its inception, Temple Israel was a Reform congregation, a theologically progressive denomination that stresses the social justice imperatives of Judaism. Yet the early members of Temple Israel included not just Reform Jews, but Conservative and Orthodox Jews as well; navigating these interdenominational relationships would prove to be a significant part of the congregation’s early development.
Sojourners Link to Story
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Christians and Jews unite to protest goods made in West Bank

Christians and Jews protest in an interfaith alliance against SodaStream, a company with a manufacturing plant in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.
Ecumenical News Link to Story
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Diverse Crowd Gathers at "Standing Together" Event for Israel

The second “Standing Together: An Evening of Christian-Jewish Support for Israel” was a night of community for those across the Midwest and across religious faiths who are passionate in their defense of Israel.
David's Voice Link to Story

About

Dawn Araujo-Hawkins

I am a staff writer for the Global Sisters Report, a special project of the National Catholic Reporter that provides coverage of Catholic sisters and nuns.

I graduated from Ball State University with a degree in magazine journalism and French and then studied urban and intercultural issues at Cincinnati Christian University, earning a Master of Arts in Religion.

I have a tenacious faith in the necessity of print media. I love em dashes and semicolons, but my relationship with the Oxford comma is evolving. My longstanding aversion to the inverted pyramid is well-documented.